Looking Back at the History of Air Conditioning

old air condition If you are like many homeowners, chances are that your air conditioner is one of the most important appliances in your home. On a hot day, your ac system allows your family to remain cool and comfortable. In fact, it may be hard to imagine a world without air conditioning. Air conditioning technology can trace its roots back to the 1700s. By working with a company offering air conditioners in Jacksonville, you can install an innovative unit that will meet the needs of your family. To highlight the essential role that air conditioning plays in our daily routines, here is a look back at the history of the air conditioner.

1758: Discovery of Liquid Evaporation

The history of air conditioning began in 1758, when noted inventor Benjamin Franklin discovered the property of liquid evaporation. Franklin determined that liquids such as alcohol and water create a cooling effect as they evaporate. Today, the phenomenon of liquid evaporation still plays a critical role in the air conditioners that we use in our homes.

1830: Creation of the Ice Compressor

The very first air conditioning unit was created in the 1830s by a doctor named John Gorrie. Gorrie’s preliminary air conditioner was called an ice compressor. This innovative invention used ice and liquid evaporation to cool hot buildings. Even though Gorrie’s early air conditioner never achieved wide attention, his invention paved the way for the air conditioning systems that are used today.

1931: Invention of the Individual Air Conditioner

Throughout the early 1900s, inventors created several versions of the first air conditioner. These early air conditioners were very large and bulky. In 1931, J.Q. Sherman and H.H. Shultz pioneered the first ever window-mounted, individual room air conditioner. This system allowed homeowners to cool rooms individually. To this day, many people rely on individual room air conditioners to ensure their comfort at home.

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